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Protocols

Contents

Waiting List

Introducing yourself

After your initial introduction, we will ask you to thoroughly review a document that details our philosophies, policies, procedures, and protocols on breeding and caring for Newfoundlands. If you opt to move forward, you may request to fill out a questionnaire.

Getting to know you

The details you share in the questionnaire will aid us in getting to know you better. The questionnaire is not an application and submitting it does not place you on our waiting list.

Meeting in person

The next step involves meeting in person. We accept first kennel visits during the two months prior to a planned breeding, assuming the estimated litter size exceeds our current waiting list.

Estimating litter size

There is no definitive way to determine the number of viable pups until they are a few days old. We do the best we can. We use ultrasounds, radiographs, and the dam’s history to aid us, but in the end, all we can do is estimate the number of pups that will be available. For this reason, we maintain a second list that serves as our reserve waiting list.

Populating the waiting list

The list begins with us

Depending on the size of the litter, the individual pups, and the needs of our breeding program, we select our keeper pup, which will act as our comparison pup for the litter. In most cases, we keep a single puppy. On rare occasions, we have chosen up to three pups, but that is the exception and not the rule.

Next, we carry forward

Next on our waiting list are those families carried forward from the prior litter. This may happen if the previous litter size was overestimated, or if there were stillbirths, or neonatal deaths. Under these circumstances families are given the option of being placed on the waiting list for the next litter.

Then, come people we know

Prior to first kennel visits resuming, we will allow people that have already successfully raised a Hannibal Newf to request placement on the waiting list. Since we have a history with these families, a first kennel visit is not required.

And then we open the list

If the probability of available pups in the upcoming litter warrants it, we will open the list to the public, and begin the process of first kennel visits.

First kennel visits

First visits normally include only the adult family members. You may request a first kennel visit after familiarizing yourself with this document and submitting a questionnaire. The visit may take two or more hours. We will review your questionnaire, as well as this document. During this visit, you will meet the dam and resident Newfs. First kennel visits are made on the understanding that there is no obligation by either party.

Placement on the waiting list

After a first kennel visit (and preferably after visiting at least two or three other Newf kennels) you may ask to be placed on the waiting list for the next litter. We do not solicit families for our puppies. It is up to you to contact us and explicitly request to go on our waiting list. Placement on the waiting list is dependent upon on our confirmation via email.

Reserve waiting list

Once the primary list is full, a reserve waiting list is set up. A handful of individuals, willing to accept placement on the secondary list, are offered first kennel visits. After their visit, they may request to be placed on our reserve waiting list. Should someone drop off the primary waiting list, or if the litter is larger than expected, we draw from the reserve waiting list.

How the waiting list works

First, we pick our keeper pup

The litter is continually assessed from birth onward. At six weeks of age they are temperament tested. At eight weeks of age, their confirmation is assessed, and the comparison pup is selected.

Matching pups to families

From the moment we first meet you, we focus on your needs and expectations for your new puppy. Our priority is to match each pup with their ideal family. We take into consideration the order in which individuals are placed on the waiting list, as well as their preferences.

If a match isn't perfect

If you are not thrilled with the pup you are matched with, or if a suitable pup is not available, you may ask to be placed on the waiting list for the next litter.

More pups than families

On occasion, we have more pups than families on our waiting list. This may happen if a puppy and family match isn't perfect, or if someone decides to wait for a puppy from a future litter, or the litter was underestimated in size. In these cases, we draw from our reserve waiting list.

Once you’re on the list

Once you are on the waiting list, you will be added to the Hannibal Family email group. It is through this group that we raise the litter together for the first eight months. During the first 12 weeks of life, we share regular photos, video, weights, and updates on the litter as they grow. Once the pups leave for their new homes, we will ask you to share weekly weights and diet (foot type and amount fed). Questions are encouraged. Photos and stories are enjoyed by all. This is a private Yahoo group. Membership is restricted to those that are either waiting for, have, or have had a Hannibal Newf.

 

The First Eight Months

During the whelping and first week, live streaming of the litter is available to the Hannibal Family group. When the pups are one week of age until they leave for their new homes, streaming is available to the public. We post photos, video, weights, milestones, and other news to the Hannibal Family on a regular basis.

0 to 1 Week

  • After the whelps are 48 hours old, you will be notified that deposits are being accepted. If your deposit is not received within seven days of the notification being sent, we will assume that you have changed your mind, and we will find an alternate family for your place on the waiting list.

1 to 8 Weeks

  • You are encouraged to visit weekly. We do request only adults visit for the first four weeks, children are welcome from 4-12 weeks.
  • We begin the process of assessing pups while identifying your needs and expectations for your future pup.
  • It is recommended you begin preparing facilities for your new puppy.
  • You may request a home visit by one of the breeders.
  • At 6 weeks of age, the puppies are temperament tested.
  • We register the litter with the Canadian Kennel Club.

8 to 9 Weeks

  • Pups receive their first set of vaccinations, they are microchipped, and have their first vet examination.
  • We select our keeper pup. This puppy will be the comparison pup for the litter.
  • We carefully match each puppy to their new family.

9 to 12 Weeks

  • You are encouraged to visit weekly.
  • You will book your puppy care appointment and/or puppy pick up appointment.
  • You will arrange for first training classes.
  • You will select a veterinarian.
  • You will locate a feed supplier.
  • You will submit a registered name for your puppy prior to your puppy pick up appointment.
  • Your puppy will receive its second set of vaccination and vet exam around 12 weeks of age.

Puppy Care Appointment

The puppy care appointment takes two or more hours and includes detailed care instructions, an initial training session, and grooming lesson with tools provided by us. This appointment may be scheduled when your pup is 9-12 weeks of age, or may be combined with your puppy pick up appointment.

12 to 13 Weeks

  • Pups start leaving for their new homes.
  • Follow up phone call from us within 24 to 48 hours.

3 to 8 Months

  • You are asked to email us weekly weights and amount/type of food eaten. We will compile data for the litter and share on the Hannibal Family group.
  • Questions and answers are shared on the Hannibal Family group.
  • We register the pups individually with the Canadian Kennel Club, and forward registration certificate within six months of date of sale as required by federal law in Canada.
  • You may schedule an appointment for a second grooming lesson when your pup is eight to 12 months of age. Additional tools to help manage an adult coat are supplied by us at that time.

 

Breeding Policies

Our Breeding Priorities

  • To maintain the sweet disposition that is the hallmark of the Newfoundland Dog.
  • To produce sound, long living dogs, free of major genetic faults, who are capable of performing the traditional work of the breed as draft dogs, water rescue dogs and as companions and protectors of children.
  • To produce litters such that each and every dog is in reasonable conformity with the breed standard of the Canadian Kennel Club.

Hannibal Dams and Hannibal Sires

  • Temperament tested by us to ensure that their offspring are absolutely and unconditionally safe with both adults and children.
  • Have the following Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) verifiable health clearances:
    • Hips (multi-generational clear)
    • Elbows
    • Heart (cleared by a cardiologist with echocardiogram)
    • Cystinuria
    • Thyroid
    • Eyes
    • Patellas
    • Shoulders
  • Available for your personal assessment

Sires Used From Other Kennels

  • Have a minimum of the following Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) verifiable health clearances:
    • Hips
    • Elbows
    • Heart
  • Plus known cystinuria status

 

Placement Protocols

Pups Under Four Months of Age

  • Fee is $3,000.  (The adoption fee will increase to $3,500 on March 1, 2018.)
  • Fifty per cent deposit required to hold pup. Deposits are not accepted before the pups are at least 48 hours old. Balance of fee is due when pup is ready to be picked up, usually at 12 to 13 weeks. Pup may be left with breeders for an additional period, if required.
  • Acquired with a standard non-breeding agreement.
  • Warrantied until six years of age to be functionally sound.
  • Warrantied to live at least twelve years.
  • Temperament with humans unconditionally warrantied for the life of the dog.
  • Veterinarian examined and given first shots at eight to nine weeks and second vet exam and shots at 12 to 13 weeks. All placements are conditional on the pup passing these two vet examinations.

Newfs Over Four Months of Age

Conditions of placement and fees for Newfs over four months of age are set on an individual basis.

Rehomed Hannibal Newfs

On rare occasion, a Hannibal Newf will be returned to us. Once they are assessed and ready to be placed with a new family, we post an announcement on the homepage of our website. Conditions of placement and fees for rehomed Newfs are set on an individual basis.

Outside of Canada

Only to recognized breeders or to breeders under mentorship to recognized breeders.

Our Services

  • Consultation, at no charge, for the life of the dog; in urgent situations, at any time of the day or night.
  • Grooming lessons at 12 weeks, 8-12 months (optional), and at any time during the life of the dog on request – there is no charge for this service.
  • Comparison pup usually raised by breeder until litter is eight months of age. Weekly comparisons of weights and food (type and quantity) of comparison pup and littermates shared via email list. Internet access is therefore a requirement.
  • Assistance in finding a veterinarian and/or training classes.
  • Assistance in locating suppliers of feed, pens/kennels, dog shelters, crates and other necessary equipment.
  • Sponsorship for and/or information on regional and national dog clubs for Newfoundlands.
  • Arbitration at no cost (through the Newfoundland Dog Club of Canada or the Newfoundland Club of America) for all written contractual arrangements.
  • Canadian Kennel Club registration certificate forwarded by breeders within six months of whelping.

 

Warranty

Soundness Warranty

The Newfoundland dog described above is warrantied until he/she is six years of age against all genetic and congenital defects that would render him/her functionally unsound. Functionally unsound means that the dog has a physical problem that impairs his/her ability to function as a normal healthy pet or of doing the traditional work of a Newfoundland, i.e. draft and water rescue work. Should such a problem arise, it is the responsibility of the purchaser to notify the breeders as soon as possible and within the period of the warranty.

If the dog is found to be functionally unsound before the end of the warranty period, he/she will be replaced by a pup from a litter of the purchaser’s choosing. The replacement dog will have a warranty at least as good as that of the original dog. Not covered are injuries such as damage to the cruciate ligament.

The breeders will not require return of the original dog unless circumstances warrant.

The purchaser is responsible for providing proper care for the dog. Failure to follow the breeders’ instructions for diet, care, and management of the dog will result in voiding of this part of the warranty. Proof of meeting the dietary requirement must be provided on request. Changing the base diet and/or giving supplements without the consent of the breeders will void this part of the warranty. A list of currently acceptable foodsis available from the breeders; other foods may be added to the list from time.

The soundness portion of the warranty will be voided if the dog is neutered/spayed before 18 months of age unless done with the breeders’ consent. Females that have had their first heat and are at least 14 months of age will normally be permitted by the breeders to be spayed.

Minimum Life Expectancy Warranty

The Newfoundland dog described above is warrantied to live a minimum of 12 years if fed a diet from the approved food list unless death is the result of an excluded cause or if the purchaser did not follow the diet and other management instructions of the breeders. Failure to follow the breeders’ instructions for diet, care, and management of the dog will result in voiding of this part of the warranty. Proof of meeting the dietary requirement must be provided on request. Changing the base diet and/or giving supplements without the consent of the breeders will void this part of the warranty. A list of currently acceptable foods is available from the breeders; other foods may be added to the list from time to time.

If the dog dies before the warrantied age, the breeders will credit the purchaser with a pro-rated discount based on the original fee on the purchase of a subsequent dog.

Excluded causes of death:

  • accidents (e.g. motor vehicle collision),
  • poisoning (deliberate or accidental),
  • attack by an animal or person,
  • infections (viral, bacterial, or fungal),
  • avertible diseases (e.g. heartworm) and
  • lack of recommended preventive veterinary care.

The maximum life expectancy portion of the warranty will be voided if the dog is neutered/spayed before 18 months of age unless done with the breeders’ consent. Females that have had their first heat and are at least 14 months of age will normally be permitted by the breeders to be spayed.

Temperament Warranty

The Newfoundland dog described above is unconditionally warrantied by the breeders to have, throughout his/her life, the sweet disposition towards humans that is the hallmark of the breed.

If the dog is found to have a temperament problem at any time, he/she will be replaced by a pup from a litter of the purchaser’s choosing. The replacement dog will have a warranty at least as good as that of the original dog.

For replacement, the original dog must be returned to the breeders with all the necessary papers signed as soon as practical.

General Warranty

If the purchaser is unable/unwilling to keep/care for the dog for any reason, the dog is to be returned to the breeders with all necessary papers signed. If the dog has been cared for up to the date of return according to the breeders’ instructions, the breeders will credit the purchaser with a pro-rated discount based on the original fee on the purchase of a subsequent dog.

 

Approved Food List

Diet A — Whole Fish Raw Diet

Wild raw fatty fish such as herring, mackerel, trout, salmon, smelt, or sardines [whole and uncleaned].

Ideally you should feed small fishes of a pound or less. Usual consumption is 1½ to 2 pounds per day. The fish can be eaten frozen or thawed, whole or ground.

Diet B — Commercial Raw Diet

  • Red Dog Blue Kat – herring or salmon formulas
  • Most commercial oily fish based raw formulas similar to above

Diet C — Homemade Diet

A minimum of two fish units AND a minimum of two yolk-bread units per day.

Fish Units
Regular sardines in spring water (106 g / 3¾ oz) 1 can 106 g 3¾ oz
S&F Portuguese Sardines in water (120 g / 4½ oz) 1 can 120 g 4½ oz
Sockeye salmon (213 g / 7½ oz) 1/3 can 70 g 2½ oz
Wild pink pacific salmon (213 g / 7½ oz) 1/2 can 105 g 3¾ oz
Wild pink pacific salmon (418 g / 14¾ oz) 1/4 can 105 g 3¾ oz
Jack Mackerel from Chile or Peru (425 g / 15 oz) 1/4 can 105 g 3¾ oz
Yolk-Bread Units
1 to 2 raw yolks   AND   1 slice pumpernickel bread
1 to 2 raw yolks   AND   2 slices sourdough bread
1 to 2 raw yolks   AND   2 slices rye bread with bacterial culture or sourdough

Sample Homemade Diets

The following examples are not meant to be definitive as metabolism and other factors such as level of exercise and ambient temperature all play a part in the dietary needs of a dog.

Sample Diet for 2-Year-Old 120 lb. Newfoundland

3 Fish Units and 12 Yolk-Bread Units Per Day

Morning
  • ½ can (213 g) sockeye salmon (1½ fish units)
  • 6 slices pumpernickel (6 bread units)
  • 6 raw egg yolks (6 yolk units)
  • 1 large dog biscuit for teeth and gums
Evening
  • ½ can (213 g) sockeye salmon (1½ fish units)
  • 6 slices pumpernickel (6 bread units)
  • 6 raw egg yolks (6 yolk units)
  • 1 large dog biscuit for teeth and gums
Sample Diet for 9-Year-Old 130 lb. Newfoundland

3 Fish Units and 4 Yolk-Bread Units Per Day

Morning
  • 1 large dog biscuit for teeth and gums
Evening
  • 1 can (213 g) sockeye salmon (3 fish units)
  • 4 slices pumpernickel (4 bread units)
  • 8 raw egg yolks (4 yolk units)
  • Double-dose of curcumin capsules
  • 1 large dog biscuit for teeth and gums

Diet D — Semi-Moist Diet

The semi-moist diet is based on commercial dog food rolls.

  • Rollover Super Premium Wild Pacific Salmon Dog Food
  • Any of the Rollover Premium Dog Food AND a minimum of two fish units daily
  • Any of the Natural Balance Dog Food Rolls AND a minimum of two fish units daily
Fish Units
Regular sardines in spring water (106 g / 3¾ oz) 1 can 106 g 3¾ oz
S&F Portuguese Sardines in water (120 g / 4½ oz) 1 can 120 g 4½ oz
Sockeye salmon (213 g / 7½ oz) 1/3 can 70 g 2½ oz
Wild pink pacific salmon (213 g / 7½ oz) 1/2 can 105 g 3¾ oz
Wild pink pacific salmon (418 g / 14¾ oz) 1/4 can 105 g 3¾ oz
Jack Mackerel from Chile or Peru (425 g / 15 oz) 1/4 can 105 g 3¾ oz

Sample Semi-Moist Diet

The following example is not meant to be definitive as metabolism and other factors such as level of exercise and ambient temperature all play a part in the dietary needs of a dog.

Sample Diet for 12-Year-Old 105 lb. Newfoundland
Morning
  • Two 1-inch slices of Rollover Chicken Dog Food from 2 kg roll
  • 1 can (106 g) sardines in spring water (1 fish unit)
  • Two 500 mg krill oil capsules
  • 1 DentaStix for teeth and gums
Evening
  • One 1-inch slices of Rollover Chicken Dog Food from 2 kg roll
  • 1 can (106 g) sardines in spring water (1 fish unit)
  • Two 500 mg krill oil capsules
  • 1 DentaStix for teeth and gums

Note

The sliced dog food is normally cut into four or more pieces. The pieces can be fed from a bowl, or for elderly or infirm, by hand. If feeding by hand, it can be done throughout the day instead of just at meal times.

Rolled dog food is sold in a variety of sizes. It is recommended you play close attention to the difference in weight and calories per inch for each product. A 1-inch slice of an 800 g roll is not equal to a 2-inch slice of a 400 g roll.

Diet E — Kibble & Raw Combination Diet

Whole Fish Raw Diet (Diet A) or Commercial Raw Diet (Diet B) for one meal AND kibble (Orijen Six Fish or Acana Pacifica) as the other daily meal.

Diet F — Kibble & Fish Combination Diet

Orijen Six Fish or Acana Pacifica AND a minimum of two fish units per day.

Fish Units
Regular sardines in spring water (106 g / 3¾ oz) 1 can 106 g 3¾ oz
S&F Portuguese Sardines in water (120 g / 4½ oz) 1 can 120 g 4½ oz
Sockeye salmon (213 g / 7½ oz) 1/3 can 70 g 2½ oz
Wild pink pacific salmon (213 g / 7½ oz) 1/2 can 105 g 3¾ oz
Wild pink pacific salmon (418 g / 14¾ oz) 1/4 can 105 g 3¾ oz
Jack Mackerel from Chile or Peru (425 g / 15 oz) 1/4 can 105 g 3¾ oz

Supplements

If you choose to supplement a pup under five months, please check with the breeder first.

Sockeye Salmon Oil

Sockeye salmon oil is for prevention of cancer, for prevention/easing of arthritis, for extra omega-3. Usual dosage for sockeye salmon oil is 1000 mg for every 20 lbs. of body weight to a maximum of six capsules daily. If canned sockeye is part of the regular diet, then this supplement is not needed.

Krill Oil

Krill oil is an alternative to sockeye salmon oil for Newfs that have a digestive sensitivity to high doses of sockeye salmon oil. An adult Newf should get 1000 mg to 2000 mg daily of krill oil.

Turmeric/Curcumin

Turmeric or its active component, curcumin, is for prevention of cancer, for prevention/easing of arthritis, and as a liver protectant.

A turmeric/curcumin capsule that has high bioavailability is essential. Contact breeders for brands that have been successfully tested on our Newfs. Dosage for young dogs for prevention should be the recommended dose for adult humans. For senior Newf (eight years and over) or for dogs that show signs of arthritis, the dose should be doubled.

Alternatively, a turmeric paste for dogs can be used; recipes can be found on the Internet OR you can use a turmeric tea such as the one made by Celebration Herbals.
made by Celebration Herbals.

General Notes

Normally, a Newf would be fed twice a day but some prefer once a day and others may like a small and large meal daily.

Canned fish should be fed with the liquid. Canned fish usually has the final cooking in the can and most of the nutrients that are cooked out of the flesh go into the liquid. However, some Newfs don’t tolerate the high sodium, especially in the store brands of salmon. Often just draining the liquid will suffice; otherwise a low-sodium alternative should be used like Brunswick Sardines in Spring Water.

Ideally pups under five months of age should remain on the diet they were weaned on.

Raw egg yolks can be mixed in or top dressed on kibble as a supplement which would provide a raw element to the diet and the all important digestive enzymes that are destroyed by cooking.

For senior Newfoundlands (eight years and over) a kibble-free diet (to prevent bloat) is strongly recommended along with supplementation with sockeye salmon oil and turmeric.

After each meal, your Newf should be given a large dog biscuit or DentaStix for good oral health. Large dog biscuits usually have 100 – 130 calories (equivalent to ¼ cup of kibble, and this should be factored into their diet.

Feeding foods other than those listed above, with the exception of normal dog treats such as dog biscuits, or the odd table scrap, or minor amounts of taste enhancers, to a Hannibal Newf will normally void both the soundness and the longevity guarantees. Receipts or best by stamps or other proof of feed used may be requested if claiming on either one of these guarantees. The temperament guarantee is not affected by food fed. If there should be a problem with the recommended foods or you have an alternate preference, please consult the breeders for other acceptable options.

Updated July 2017

 

Preparing for Your Newf Pup

Adding a Newfoundland pup to your family, particularly if it is your first dog, represents a major event in your life. To ensure that it begins on the best possible note, some advance preparation is needed for your new family member. Please feel free to contact us; we are available to help you locate the resources that you need.

Feed

When your pup moves to your house, virtually everything will be different. One of the few things that can and should be the same is his food. Ensuring that you have the proper food on hand for his arrival will help him cope with the transition.

Outside Accommodation

While Hannibal Newfs are expected to live in your home with family, there are many benefits to having outdoor accommodation as well, such as:

  • Housetraining is easier, especially when combined with the recommended feeding protocol.
  • Your Newf will have freedom of movement when he might otherwise be confined in a crate.
  • Your Newf will have visual, auditory and sensory stimulation that is not available indoors.
  • Your Newf can have unlimited access to water.
  • Your Newf will be able to relieve himself in an appropriate area.
  • If you cannot closely supervise your pup, he can be placed in his pen where he will be safe and comfortable.
  • In an emergency, your Newf can be left safely in his pen with water until you return or arrange for his care.
  • A pen with a crushed stone base does not get muddy, and neither will your Newf.
  • During the winter, gravel will allow the urine to drain and not puddle on the surface or trickle underfoot.
  • If there was a fire in your home while you were away, your Newf would be safer in his pen.
  • A padlock on the gate will alleviate any concerns for safety.
  • A dog door from your home directly into a secure kennel will give an adult Newf the best of both worlds.

For pups under eight months, outdoor accommodation is highly recommended. However, Newfs of all ages can benefit from such alternate housing.

If deemed necessary, a pen and/or fencing plus the shelter should be in place before your pup arrives. Without this, housetraining could be become a challenge.

Fencing should be a minimum of five feet high (six feet is preferable) and the area ideally a minimum of 100 square feet. Portable dog kennels (composed of modular preassembled panels) are highly recommended. There are many forms of shelter that you can use. We would be pleased to advise you on all your options.

The ideal surface is crushed stone with a minimum depth of three inches. The usual stone is “clear” or “clean” 3/4-inch crushed limestone. You will need a minimum of one yard to cover a 10-foot by 10-foot pen; however, you might consider ordering extra stone as you will need it to fill in holes and to add as the original packs down. It is a good idea to put railway ties or some other border material around your pen area to prevent the spread of the stone onto your lawn.

Natural or manmade shade is crucial for the hot months. You can buy tarps that are specifically designed to provide shade for dog pens.

Since every situation is different, you should discuss the outside accommodation with us in detail and check with your local by-laws prior to investing in materials.

Obedience Classes

You should contact local dog trainers, or kennel and obedience clubs, and register for group obedience classes. Private lessons are NOT recommended because your pup needs the socialization that a class setting provides.

Veterinarian

If you do not already have a veterinarian, you should try to locate one before you bring your pup home. Neighbours with dogs (preferably large breeds) are a good source. If needed, we may be able to put you in touch with local Newf owners that can recommend a vet who is experienced with the breed. Ideally, the vet clinic should be available for emergencies on a 24-hour basis.

Poop Disposal

This should be planned prior to your pup’s arrival. Methods vary from using the regular garbage (double bagging) to composting to mini-septic systems. If you have any questions on this, please ask us.

Equipment and Supplies

Basic equipment and supplies that you should have before the pup arrives:
  • Wire dog crate — minimum 24 inches wide, 48 inches long, and 32 inches high with divider panel
  • Food bowl — preferably stainless steel
  • Summer bucket — 3 to 5-gallon bucket
  • Winter bucket — 5-gallon heated bucket (available at farm supply stores)
  • Chew items — cow hooves, raw or smoked beef bones, bully sticks, or antlers
  • Leash and adjustable collar — supplied at pick up
Basic grooming tools that you will need for your pup’s first year:
  • Baby wipes — for ears, belly, and face
  • Vinegar — in a spray bottle
  • Lemon juice — in a spray bottle
  • Nail clippers — heavy duty clippers, not guillotine-type with replaceable blade
  • Styptic powder or liquid clotting agent — quickly stops the bleeding
  • Pin brush — supplied at pick up
  • Slicker brush — supplied at pick up
  • Fine comb — supplied at pick up
  • Medium comb with rotating teeth — supplied at pick up
  • Miracle Coat Conditioner & Lusterizer — supplied at pick up
  • Wet comb — supplied at second grooming appointment
  • Shedding rake with rotating teeth — supplied at second grooming appointment
  • Thinning shears — supplied at second grooming appointment

At your first grooming lesson during your Puppy Care Appointment, we will discuss necessary grooming equipment. At the optional second grooming lesson, after your pup is eight months of age, we will show you how to care for an adult coat.
 

Caring for Your Newf Pup

Health

Your puppy has been wormed and immunized as appropriate for its age. The documents from our veterinarian show the immunization received and when the next vaccinations are due.

Please consult your veterinarian after taking your puppy home. On your first visit, bring the immunization and worming record for your vet’s information.

Most vets recommend a daily or monthly preventative medication for heartworm. After the first year, this is not a problem; however, in the first year, should you and your vet decide to put the pup on this medication, please ensure that your pup’s weight is monitored closely to ensure the correct dosage. We do not give heartworm medication to our Newfs, instead we opt for an annual blood test beginning in the dog’s second spring.

Diet

Your puppy has been weaned on an ancestral diet. You must feed this diet (or an approved alternative) to your Hannibal Newf to keep the soundness and longevity warranties in effect. Any other diet or supplements will void the soundness and longevity warranties unless special permission is given by the breeders.

Fresh water should always be accessible to your Newf, and is essential at mealtimes and in hot weather. It may be necessary to limit water intake immediately before bed when housetraining pups.

Table scraps should be avoided with a pup under six months. After six months of age, they may be given occasionally, provided the regular food is being eaten consistently.

The quantity of food to be served at each meal will vary according to age, individual metabolism, level of activity, and ambient temperature. We will work with you to adjust the quantity fed, as needed.

Small dog or cat treats may be given between meals as treats. Use caution with liver treats as these may promote diarrhea.

From time to time, your Newf will go off his food for a day or two. This is normal and usually not a cause for concern. If this becomes a persistent problem, please consult the breeders.

Feeding Routine

Pups and adults are normally fed twice a day. Some older Newfs may fare better on a single daily meal as long as kibble is not part of the diet; you can consult with us on this.

Feeding for a pup may be done indoors or outside in a pen. Most pups will poop within 30 minutes of eating, if fed on a regular schedule. After eating, a pup should spend time outside, either in their pen or supervised, to ensure that they have eliminated before bringing them inside.

Chew items are needed for healthy teeth and gums at all ages. During the teething period, they are indispensable. You can use such things as hooves, raw or smoked beef bones, bully sticks or antlers. Rawhide and pig ears should not be given to your Newf – there is a danger of choking and/or bowel obstruction. It is imperative that you regularly inspect chew items to ensure their integrity.

Grooming

  • Your Newf should be groomed at least once a week year-round.
  • During the “shedding periods” your Newf should be raked or combed daily or every other day.
  • In normal circumstances, your Newf should only need to be bathed once or twice a year.
  • Front toe nails should be clipped as necessary (usually monthly or bi-monthly). The rear toe nails grow at a much slower pace and may not need to be clipped as frequently. While the rear nails give better traction outdoors, they may have the opposite effect indoors on slippery floors.
  • Ears should be checked at least once a week and cleaned as required. If your Newf tends to get ear infections, then regular spraying of the ears with lemon juice is recommended.
  • At each stage of your Newf’s coat development, we will show you the grooming techniques and equipment necessary. There is no charge for these grooming consultations.
  • The first lesson is normally during your Puppy Care Appointment. Once your pup is eight months of age you may book another grooming appointment with us. This latter grooming session also includes a full check up by the breeders, including comparison with a littermate (when possible) and verification of the microchip. Additional grooming tools will be supplied by the breeders at this time.

Cautions

  • Do not over exercise your pup in the first six months. Self-exercising is best. Daily walks are fine if you adjust the length to the pup’s age and stamina. If in doubt, please consult us.
  • Jogging is not a suitable activity for a Newf; they overheat easily, even in winter. Dog carting, dog sledding, back packing and other forms of draft work should not be attempted until your pup is at least one year of age. We would be pleased to advise you on this.
  • Protect your pup from roughhousing with people or older dogs. Never let children sit on or attempt to ride your Newf at any age.
  • Care should be taken when letting your pup or dog exit any vehicle. Never let a pup or dog jump out of the back of a pickup truck or large SUV.
  • Newfoundlands should not be tied on a rope or chain on a regular basis. As a very temporary measure or while traveling, this may be necessary: however, on a permanent basis, only a fenced yard or pen should be used to contain your Newf. When a Newf is tethered they must be supervised.
  • Choke or slip collars should only be used in conjunction with a leash. The snap-around collar can be put on the dead ring when not being used with a leash.
  • A pup under six months should have his collar removed when in a crate unsupervised (such as overnight when everyone is sleeping). Flea collars may result in allergic reactions.

Dog Clubs

Joining your local Newf club will enhance the relationship you have with your dog. You will receive newsletters and be invited to participate in a variety of activities, including water rescue and carting seminars, as well as social, charity, and fun events.

Disinfecting a Dog Pen

A dog pen should be disinfected at least monthly in warm weather. Between disinfecting times, you can keep your pen sanitary and free from odors by hosing each spot from which you scooped poop. When the temperatures drop below freezing for any part of the day, you do not need to disinfect at all.

There are many ways of disinfecting. The method that we recommend is to heavily sprinkle salt over the stones and then wet the gravel with a hose. Rock salt, hay salt, common fine salt, or mixing salts are available from rural feed stores in 20 kg or 40 kg bags. If this method is unsuitable for your situation, please consult us for alternative methods.